The Possum!

May. 21st, 2017 11:00 pm
cuboz: (Default)
[personal profile] cuboz
Started work at 12.31pm today, for another relatively long shift... lots of mileage - almost the maximum. But long shifts on a Sunday (and a Saturday) are good! Cha ching!

Got home around 9.00pm, which is roughly the time when "Baz" comes to visit. Craige started feeding a possum about 2 years ago, and he thinks this is now one of the kids, but he has called him (or her!), "Baz", short for Bazza, or Barry.

He/She doesn't come EVERY night, but is out there around 9.00pm most nights... Sitting on the top of the verandah / awning, waiting for food. So it's small pieces of apple, banana or carrots - nice healthy stuff. But not too much... Rather adorable, really. Not quite trusting enough to be patted, but certainly will come and take food out of your hand, as you'll see in the video...

It's ironic that I'm feeding it. Here in Australia, they're protected, but in New Zealand, where they were introduced and became a pest to our native animals... They are trapped, killed, and their fur turned in to clothing. It's often blended with merino wool, and it's rather soft and luxurious...

Say hello to "Baz"!



"Baz" comes to visit...

Feeeeeeed meeeeee!



Feeding "Baz"

This is a VIDEO!
tamaranth: me, in the sun (Default)
[personal profile] tamaranth
2017/46: The Deeds of the Disturber -- Elizabeth Peters
"... your – how shall I put it? – your panache, your disregard for convention, your remarkable talent for criminal investigation –"
"I prefer the term 'panache'," I interrupted. [loc 624]

The only novel in the series to be set wholly in London, Deeds of the Disturber opens with a mysterious death at the British Museum. With remarkable alacrity, the popular press start on about curses, not significantly spoilery )
surovmag: (Default)
[personal profile] surovmag
Сегодня едросы проводят очередной этап имитации демократии, у них типа праймериз кандидатов на выборы городской думы. Именно в ходе типа агитационной компании и прозвучало пресловутое предложение о переименовании.
Вчера, в очередной раз очищая подъезд и вход в него от агиток (весьма недешёвых кстати, плотная мелованная бумага, полноцвет) с физиономиями кандидатов, подумал, а мож сходить, сделать им сюрприз, вычеркнуть в бюллютне все фамилии граждан, желающих коррумпироваться, а сверху написать что-то для них страшное, типа "навальный", "мальцев", "домик для уточки"...
Однако, вспомнил, что ведь там попросят "паспорт либо документ, его замеящий", а потом внесут в списки какие-нить и начнут спам рассылать, которые не сгорят, как  принято, а это ж такой позор, что хрен потом отмоешься...
В общем, пусть сидят скучают, сегодня день такой летний жаркий, что даже торговые центры опустели, к ним врят ли кто вообще пойдёт... всё равно у них там всё заранее расписано...
sovay: (Sovay: David Owen)
[personal profile] sovay
Today has been very social, though not at all unpleasant. My brother's godparents are visiting from the Southwest, so we spent the afternoon with my family and then a sort of pre-Memorial Day dinner, which turned out surf-and-turf. There was way too much zucchini. There was not too much key lime pie. My three-year-old niece has discovered a pair of small stuffed animal rabbits which originally belonged to me and my brother—Bunnicula and Butterscotch—and is carrying them everywhere, even to dinner. She has decided that she wants a goat as a pet. (Suggestions that she ask for a pony instead were met with blank disdain.) I am no help to her parents in this argument. I think a goat in the family would be a great idea.

In the evening I met [personal profile] rushthatspeaks for a sold-out showing of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992) at the Brattle Theatre: I thought it was great. It's more overtly supernatural than the series overall—it's focused on the most overtly supernatural strand—but it's also decisively grounded by Sheryl Lee's performance, with Laura Palmer's very realistic anger, damage, and agency (it was not clear in the show that her final status was a choice rather than an inevitable consequence or a weird side effect of the manner of her death; the film offers her no good options, but she absolutely opts for the best of them, which makes it strangely difficult for me to classify the film as horror, even though content-wise I don't know what else it should be) interlocking across registers with the characters who live in the soapier layers of the plot. I was glad to see Harry Dean Stanton turn up in the supporting cast, because he feels existentially like someone who should inhabit a David Lynch universe. Now we just need to finish watching the remaining half of Season Two and figure out what to do about the third-season revival.

A later interlude of placidly watching candymaking videos by Public Displays of Confection with [personal profile] spatch was interrupted by Autolycus violently throwing up all over a box of hardcover Le Guin and Tanith Lee, but fortunately the box had a lid on it, the books have been transplanted to a high shelf, and a very shaken small cat was comforted after we emergency-mopped the floor. (There was much anxious purring. We reassured him that we know he does not throw up maliciously. He never looks like he enjoys it.)

Unless it gets a National Theatre-style broadcast, I don't have a hope of seeing the Crucible's Julius Caesar on account of it being in Sheffield and me being on the other side of an ocean, but it's being done with a diverse, gender-equal cast and I wish I could see it, because Zoë Waites has a hell of a lean and hungry look:

Cassius


We are talking about seeing Jacques Tati's Playtime (1967) tomorrow. I haven't seen the movie since 2010, when it was also on film at the Brattle and I loved it. I should get to bed.

30 Day Music Meme day 14

May. 28th, 2017 07:54 am
ghoti_mhic_uait: (Rings)
[personal profile] ghoti_mhic_uait
the list )

I'm not ruling out getting married again, but it's not something I'm ready to do right now. I seem to be good at picking spouses so it would probably go well if I did. I'm eager to not organise another wedding, though, and would rather go for 'turn up, say our vows, maybe go to the pub' than anything more formal or organised. This (pdf) is the current text of our vows, Colin and I didn't promise to forsake all others, but we had a lot of long conversations about what it would mean if we did. I think whether we left that line out or how it affected our life would be part of the discussions around how any new marriage would work.

Anyway, I'm not sure whether it means literally the actual wedding ceremony (in which case, we had I the Lord of Sea and Sky, Praise the Lord, Ye Heavens Adore Him, Love Divine and Tell Out My Soul first time around) or for the reception (in which case, we had
The Nearness of You by Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong and I made sure I danced the whole song with Colin because I figured it would be about all I saw him all day. I figured we were looking at something secular, ideally, though, and I don't know that there would be space for that in the sort of ceremony I'm likely to agree to.

Putting reality aside for a moment, imagining the world in which I want a wedding with songs, I'd probably choose this waltz:

Reflecting Light by Sam Phillips
djm4: (Default)
[personal profile] djm4
2: a song you like with a number in the title

Ten Duel Commandments from Hamilton by Lin Manuel Miranda.



So, really early in this meme run, we get a song from Hamilton. It was always going to show up at some point - it's not much over a year since multiple friends with very different musical tastes raved to me about the musical, and I do in general like musicals anyway.

Ten Duel Commandments is one of the rare songs from Hamilton that can stand on its own outside the wider context of the musical. It's a beautifully-crafted exploration of the culture of duelling in late eighteenth century America, and weaves the disclosure of several crucial pieces of information through a counting motif warp that mirrors the classic pace count for a duel. And while it does stand on its own outside the bigger narrative, in the context of the musical both the song and the counting motif return multiple times at critical moments.

The song, particularly the title, consciously references Ten Crack Commandments by The Notorious B.I.G. - Lin Manuel Miranda says: 'So, I came up with the idea of doing Ten Dual Commandments because Ten Crack Commandments is a how-to guide for illegal activity in the 90s. And this is a how-to guide for illegal activities in the 1790s.'

If you haven't seen it, this Ham4Ham performance of the song outside the Theatre with stage manager Jason Bassett calling the shots is worth a look, because it's just delightful.

Balticon

May. 28th, 2017 02:54 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

I'm glad I took my piano to Balticon.
I'm glad I'm not bringing it with me tomorrow.

So much to be grateful for. So many to be grateful to. Which is another thing to be grateful for.

So much need of sleep.

Doctor Who 10.07

May. 28th, 2017 08:22 am
selenak: (Brig and Tardis by Ellisbelle)
[personal profile] selenak
This was the first Doctor Who episode since "The Caretaker" I disliked thoroughly, albeit for different reasons.

Read more... )

First contact

May. 28th, 2017 02:44 am
nineweaving: (Default)
[personal profile] nineweaving
"An amateur historian has unearthed compelling evidence that the first Australian maritime foray into Japanese waters was by convict pirates on an audacious escape from Tasmania almost two centuries ago..."





 
Hamaguchi wrote of sailors with “long pointed noses” who were not hostile, but asked in sign language for water and firewood. One had burst into tears and begun praying when an official rejected an earlier plea.

A skipper who looked 25 or 26 placed tobacco in “a suspicious looking object, sucked and then breathed out smoke”.

He had a “scarlet woollen coat” with “cuffs embroidered with gold thread and the buttons were silver-plated”, which was “a thing of great beauty, but as clothing it was gaudy”.

[...]
 

The skipper gave instructions to a crew that “in accordance with what appeared to be some mark of respect” followed orders to remove their hats “to the man, most of them revealing balding heads”.

They “exchanged words amongst themselves like birds twittering”.

A dog on the ship “did not look like food. It looked like a pet.”


 

 

Another samurai chronicler called Hirota noted the crew offered gifts including an object he later drew, which looks like a boomerang.

One sailor bared his chest to the disguised samurai to reveal a tattoo of “the upper body of a beautiful woman”, Hamaguchi wrote.

Another produced “a big glass of what appeared to be an alcoholic beverage and indicated that we should drink”.

“We declined by waving our hands, upon which they passed the glass around themselves, one by one tapping their heads as they drank to indicate the good feeling it brought them, and finished the lot.”

Nine
 
siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
This had better be awesome. I'd forgotten how much work sautéing ground sausage is. Ow.

Originally from the Peace, Love and Low Carb blog. I have, as usual, changed it:

3lb ground Italian sausage (used Johnsonville)
2 + 2 Tbsp butter
2 + 1 Tbsp olive oil
2 C spinach, packed (baby, and all of a 5oz package)
1 C carrots, diced
1 leek, not so small, cleaned and sliced
1 box (6oz) minced onion and celery
~5 C chicken stock
1.5 C lentils (green)
1 C heavy cream
1/2 C Parmesian cheese, grated
2 Tbsp Dijon mustard
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar
salt and pepper

Original instructions: Heat slow cooker on low setting. Thoroughly rinse lentils, and add to slow cooker with chicken stock.
In a large skillet over medium-high heat, brown sausage in olive oil and butter.
Using a slotted spoon, remove sausage from pan, reserving drippings. Add the cooked sausage to the slow cooker.
Add spinach, carrots, onions, garlic, leek, celery and a little salt and black pepper to the pan. Sauté vegetables over medium heat until tender. About 10 minutes.
Add sauteed vegetables to the slow cooker and mix in.
Stir in heavy cream, Parmesan cheese, Dijon mustard, and red wine vinegar. Cover and allow to cook on low 6-8 hours.

What I'm doing:
Brown sausage in olive oil and butter. Sauté veggies + salt & pepper in drippings. Package everything up and put in the fridge.
Do everything else tomorrow.

The original had one sautéing 1.5lb ground sausage in 2 Tbsp each of olive oil and butter. I wound up buying 3 1lb packs, and running low on oil in the pan about half way through and sloshed more olive oil in there. Then when sautéing the veggies (which were, like 2x the original) in the drippings, it looked too dry, so I added 2 more Tbsp of butter.

Right now I have the sausage browned and the veggies sautéd; I'm pretty much ready to combine everything when I wake up tomorrow so it can cook through the day.

Blue screen of death - kinda.

May. 27th, 2017 11:18 pm
agoodwinsmith: (Default)
[personal profile] agoodwinsmith
So. It is possible to overburden one's phone until it absolutely freezes and does not respond to buttons or begging. I had too many internet tabs open and it froze completely. However - I let the battery run down - let it absolutely drain - recharged it, and all is as it was. Whew.

Let me tell you - the thought of losing all my contacts three days before moving day - argh argh argh.

The battery is pretty good: It was at 94% when it froze at 10:05 on Thursday morning and it was completely toast at about 2:00 pm today. I don't know when it failed, but the phone was still frozen the last time I looked at 10:00 am today.

LG X Power. :)

(I can't imagine having my whole life on there - email, social media, banking - blue screen of death would be unbearable.)

Less is more

May. 28th, 2017 05:10 am
[syndicated profile] crooked_timber_feed

Posted by John Quiggin

Reading the news, I find a lot of items demonstrating a scale of values that makes no sense to me. Some are important in the grand scheme of things, some are less so, but perhaps more relevant to me. I think about writing posts but don’t find the time. So here are a few examples, which you are welcome to chew over.

  • Blowing things and people up is seen as a demonstration of clarity and resolve (unless someone is doing it to us, in which case it’s correctly recognised as cowardly and evil). The most striking recent example (on “our” side) was the instant and near-universal approval of Trump’s bombing of an airfield in Syria, which had no effect at all on events there. In this case, there was some pushback, which is a sign of hope, I guess.
  • The significance of art and artists is determined by the whims of billionaires. Referring to the sale of a painting by Jean-Michel Basquiat for over $100 million the New York Times says
    most agree that the Basquiat sale has cemented his place in the revenue pantheon with Pablo Picasso and Francis Bacon; confirming that he is not some passing trend; and forcing major museums to acknowledge that, by not having the artist in their collections, they passed over a crucial figure in art history.
    [1]
  • As far as economic research is concerned, less is more. More precisely, an academic economist with a small number of publications in top-rated journals is better regarded by other economists than one with an equal (or even somewhat larger) number of ‘good journal’ publications along with more research published in less prestigious outlets. I can vouch for that, though it’s less of a problem in Australia than in less peripheral locations. I have the impression that the same is true in other fields, but would be interested in comments.

[fn1] To be fair, this is preceded by a brief acknowledgement that “auction prices don’t necessarily translate into intrinsic value”, but there’s no suggestion that any other measure of intrinsic value is worth considering.

Comic for May 28, 2017

May. 28th, 2017 11:59 pm
[syndicated profile] dilbert_feed
Dilbert readers - Please visit Dilbert.com to read this feature. Due to changes with our feeds, we are now making this RSS feed a link to Dilbert.com.
tamaranth: me, in the sun (Default)
[personal profile] tamaranth
2017/45: A River in the Sky -- Elizabeth Peters
Americans had never established a political foothold in the Middle East. They were regarded as guests, sometimes annoying but not threatening. England bestrode the region like a colossus – one foot in India, one in Egypt, its influence stretching into large parts of Africa. England imposed her own laws and controlled every aspect of government, from education to trade.[loc. 1479]


Although, in terms of internal chronology, this comes between The Ape Who Guards the Balance and The Falcon at the Portal, it was written quite a lot later: I believe it was the last novel that Peters published before her death in 2013.
non-spoilery )

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